Last edited by Mogami
Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | History

11 edition of The Jew"s body found in the catalog.

The Jew"s body

by Sander L. Gilman

  • 249 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Routledge in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Freud, Sigmund, 1856-1939 -- Religion,
  • Antisemitism -- Psychological aspects,
  • Psychoanalysis,
  • Jews -- Public opinion,
  • Self-perception,
  • Stereotype (Psychology)

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. [244]-295) and index.

    StatementSander Gilman.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDS145 .G43 1991
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 303 p. :
    Number of Pages303
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1538107M
    ISBN 100415904587, 0415904595
    LC Control Number91016485

    When preparing a body for burial, Jewish tradition holds that the body must be carefully washed, dressed in a plain white shroud (it’s the same for both men and women), and blessed with special prayers in a process called taharah (“purification”). In many ways, . Academic study of Jewish mysticism, especially since Gershom Scholem's Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism (), distinguishes between different forms of mysticism across different eras of Jewish these, Kabbalah, which emerged in 12th-century Europe, is the most well known, but not the only typologic form, or the earliest to previous forms were Merkabah mysticism (c.

    In the "Yigdal" prayer, found towards the beginning of the Jewish prayer books used in synagogues around the world, it states "He has no semblance of a body nor is He corporeal". It is a central tenet of Judaism that God does not have any physical characteristics; [12] . These are some of the stories in “Monologues from the Makom,” a new book that explores the topics of women’s sexuality, gender and body image as they intersect with the lives of Orthodox Jewish.

    The Talmud. Talmud is the Hebrew word signifying "doctrine." The Jews say that Moses received on Mount Sinai not only the written law which is contained in the Pentateuch but an oral law, which was first communicated by him to Aaron, then by them to the seventy elders, and finally by these to the people, and thus transmitted by memory, from generation to generation. A work of grand historical and philosophical sweep, The Jewish Body discusses the subtle relationship between the Jewish conception of the physical body and the Jewish conception of a bodiless God. It is a book about the relationship between a land{u}Israel{u}and the bodily sense not merely of individuals but of a people.


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The Jew"s body by Sander L. Gilman Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Jew's Body [Gilman, Sander] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Jew's Body Sander Gilman sketches details of the anti-Semitic rhetoric about the Jewish body and mind, including medical and popular depictions of the Jewish voice, feet, and nose.

Case studies illustrate how Jews have responded to such public Cited by:   This little book describes a wide variety of issues related to the Jewish body: circumcision, Jewish law related to sex and menstruation, the periodic oscillation of Jewish opinion between reverence for and apathy towards physical strength, and common public stereotypes of the Jewish physique (and Jews' attempts to avoid looking like those stereotypes).Cited by:   The NOOK Book (eBook) of the Jewish Body by Melvin Konner at Barnes & Noble.

FREE Shipping on $35 or more. Due to COVID, orders may be delayed. Thank you for your : Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group.

This little book describes a wide variety of issues related to the Jewish body: circumcision, Jewish law related to sex and menstruation, the periodic oscillation of Jewish opinion between reverence for and apathy towards physical strength, and common public stereotypes of the Jewish physique (and Jews' attempts to avoid looking like those stereotypes)/5(5).

The Jews body book Press, - Literary Criticism - pages 0 Reviews Drawing on a wealth of medical and historical materials, Sander Gilman sketches details of the anti-Semitic rhetoric about the. Book Description. Drawing on a wealth of medical and historical materials, Sander Gilman sketches details of the anti-Semitic rhetoric about the Jewish body and mind, including medical and popular depictions of the Jewish voice, feet, and nose.

Case studies illustrate how Jews have responded to such public misconceptions as the myth of the. The Jew's Body Pages pages Drawing on a wealth of medical and historical materials, Sander Gilman sketches details of the anti-Semitic rhetoric about the Jewish body and mind, including medical and popular depictions of the Jewish voice, feet, and nose.

A Jewish anti-Christian work dating from the 5th-century, the Toledoth Yeshu, contains the claim that the disciples planned to steal Jesus's body from his tomb. In this account, the body had already been moved, and when the disciples arrived at the empty tomb they came to the incorrect conclusion that he had risen from the dead.

Jews are known as the “People of the Book” for good reason. The Torah, otherwise known as the Hebrew Bible, has inspired debate and sparked imaginations for thousands of years, and the Talmud is itself an imaginative compendium of Jewish legal debate.

Other Jews, recently, have come to regard him as a Jewish teacher. This does not mean, however, that they believe, as Christians do, that he was raised from the dead or was the messiah.

While many people now regard Jesus as the founder of Christianity, it is important to note that he did not intend to establish a new religion, at least. Melvin Konner, a renowned doctor and anthropologist, takes the measure of the “Jewish body,” considering sex, circumcision, menstruation, and even those most elusive and controversial of microscopic markers–Jewish genes.

But this is not only a book that examines the human body through the prism of Jewish culture. Gilman (humane studies, Cornell Univ.; history of psychiatry, Cornell Medical Coll.) has produced a weighty book of essays on the evolution of hatred toward Jews in Western culture.

The hatred has conjured up a series of bodily images of the prototypical cturer: Routledge. Jewish history is the history of the Jews, and their nation, religion and culture, as it developed and interacted with other peoples, religions and gh Judaism as a religion first appears in Greek records during the Hellenistic period (–31 BCE) and the earliest mention of Israel is inscribed on the Merneptah Stele dated – BCE, religious literature tells the story.

Verses - (6) The piercing of the side, with its significance - the final close of the life of earth. Verse - The Jews therefore, because it was the preparation; that is, the day before the sabbath ().This note of time certainly blends both the synoptists and John in the assurance that the crucifixion took place on a.

Drawing on a wealth of medical and historical materials, Sander Gilman sketches details of the anti-Semitic rhetoric about the Jewish body and mind, including medical and popular depictions of the Jewish voice, feet, and nose/5.

A history of the Jewish people from bris to burial, from "muscle Jews" to nose jobs. Melvin Konner, a renowned doctor and anthropologist, takes the measure of the "Jewish body," considering sex, circumcision, menstruation, and even those most elusive and controversial of /5.

Judaism (originally from Hebrew יהודה ‎, Yehudah, "Judah"; via Latin and Greek) is an ethnic religion comprising the collective religious, cultural and legal tradition and civilization of the Jewish people. Judaism is considered by religious Jews to be the expression of the covenant that God established with the Children of Israel.

It encompasses a wide body of texts, practices. “The greatest strength of the book is the issue it poses: the notion that Jews are not simply a people of the book but also a people of the body.

This is a dimension of Jewish experience that has been sorely neglected and that the book puts on the agenda of Jewish studies through its consideration of a number of dimensions of the embodiedness Reviews: 1.

In accordance with the Book of Genesis, man is considered to be created of two originally uncombined elements, soul and body; the former coming from the higher world, and the latter taken from the lower (Gen. viii. 14; Ḥag. 16a). The destiny of the latter is to serve the former, and it.

On the Jews and Their Lies (German: Von den Jüden und iren Lügen; in modern spelling Von den Juden und ihren Lügen) is a 65,word anti-Judaic treatise written in by the German Reformation leader Martin Luther (). Luther's attitude toward the Jews took different forms during his lifetime.

In his earlier period, until or not much earlier, he wanted to convert Jews to. A work of grand historical and philosophical sweep, The Jewish Body discusses the subtle relationship between the Jewish conception of the physical body and the Jewish conception of a bodiless God.

It is a book about the relationship between a land—Israel—and the bodily sense not merely of .The tension between the book" and the "body" has in recent years attracted the attention of scholars interested in the perception of the body in Judaism and the impact of religious law and performance on the body.

The fifteen contributions in this volume deal with perceptions of the "Jewish body" in a broad range of legal, poetic, mystical, philosophical and polemical early modern Jewish sources. The Jewish Telegraphic Agency spoke with Cohen and co-editor Rebecca Zimilover about why they took on this project, how the book resonates with their own experiences and what they hope people will.